Can it sell?

I’m going to be offering a new service to NaNoWriMo participants this year! If you’re writing for National Novel Writing Month, I’m offering to check your manuscript’s saleability.

Let me explain.

There’s no point to copyediting a first draft. The manuscript is going to change too much before it’s a final product ready for submission.

So…what’s helpful for first draft NaNoWriMo manuscripts? A general critique. Maybe a list of stylistic/technical/editorial issues to watch out for while you revise. And an acquisition editor’s perspective on whether your book is on the right track. Is it a publishable concept? What would make it more interesting/viable/sellable?

I’ll be offering this service at a rate of $10 per 10,000 words. I’m happy to look at a chapter, an outline, or an entire novel.

I realize there are communities for peer editing and critiquing, and I fully support the peer effort. But if you want a professional opinion, I’ll be fair, constructive, and honest.

 

Bad News Good News

The bad news: unfortunately, I’m not able to make it to DragonCon this weekend for personal reasons. I was excited to be an Attending Professional, with programming! And to debut my awesome General Leia cosplay. But, hopefully they’ll have me back next year.

The good news: I’m able to attend StrategiCon here in LA, where I’ll be running the Pathfinder Society scenario I wrote (at least two tables of it) and playing other assorted games.

Next year in Atlanta, my friends!

 

 

 

Verthandi

A while back, I wrote a mythological/historical fantasy story for an anthology called The Bard’s Tale: Stories and Recipes from the Black Dragon Inn, about one of the Fates and her interaction with a very special young girl.

That story is now available as a reprint on Curious Fictions, along with a lot of other great short stories by a lot of great authors. You can read for free, or opt in to support the site or specific authors. I hope you’ll go take a look.

(Of course, if you want to see the recipe that goes with the story, or the gorgeous story art by David Szilagyi, you’ll still have to buy the anthology. I recommend it.)

Taos Toolbox, day 0

Yesterday I met up with two other workshop participants in Albuquerque and drove them up to Taos, and then up up up some more to the Angel Fire Resort. After some kerfuffle, I got settled in and met up with the whole group for orientation and dinner.

We’re at 8300 feet or so up here, and I felt it more than I expected to, but less than would be worrisome. My manuscript is up in the first day’s round of critiques, and I made sure that I’d re-read the other two manuscripts before bed. I don’t sleep well my first night in a new place, but a couple random coyotes sang me to sleep. When I peeked out the window in the middle of the night, the stars looked low and close and bright.

My New Office Is Coming Along Nicely

009

I have officially moved house. If you need my new address and I’ve forgotten to send it, please contact me at one of the usual places. I’ve tried to at least update colleagues, but inevitably someone gets left off the cc: or it goes to spam.

My desk is the first thing we’ve set up here. That’s Toey, keeping me company. And snoring a little, after singing me the Song of Her People all night. I’ve been working on packing up the old house, moving, and doing revisions/rewrites on Hearts Are Jerks. I’m past the 25% mark, slowly but steadily giving it the polish and feels that it needs.

I don’t celebrate a Winter Holiday as such, but I wish you a pleasant one if you do.

Interview with the Editor

I was honored to have the opportunity to interview James L. Sutter for Lambda Literary. James was my editor at Paizo for Gears of Faith, and I was his editor when he wrote for my anthology When the Hero Comes Home 2.

Bisexuality is in an odd place in the matrix of queerness. It’s important to show out bisexuals in the workplace. We exist. We’re not defined by who we’re partnered with. And we bring a vision of diversity to the publishing workplace and the world of literature.

James L. Sutter Interview – Lambda LiteraryJames L. Sutter Interview – Lambda Literary

Hearts Are Jerks – update

So far, my query process has included two rejections, one request for the first fifty pages (followed by a rejection), and one enthusiastic request for the full manuscript from someone I would love to work with. The full manuscript request ended in a revise-and-resubmit invitation, with a ton of valuable feedback — all of which is dead on.

I’ve hired my long-time trusted editor to go over it for me, side by side with the agent’s feedback, so that my own blind spots don’t get in my way.

Meanwhile, I’ve submitted two new stories to short story markets. I’m currently working on a manuscript edit for a client, and an editing workshop/seminar to add to my repertoire.

Oh, and: Per my last post, converting an existing manuscript directly from first person to third person doesn’t work. At least, it didn’t work at all in this case. But I’ve discovered what my hard science fiction project actually needs, and that’s a full rewrite and present tense. It’s got a new first chapter now and it feels right.

And we keep moving forward, one word at a time. ❤

Despite Excuses

I’m at a writing retreat called Despite Excuses, up along the California coast. One week, nine writers, an amazing view of the ocean, and words words words.

This retreat is called “Despite Excuses” because there will always be excuses, reasons to not write, other things that take priority or precedence. But we get together somewhere beautiful for a week and we write anyway.

We workshopped my next novel for an hour before dinner. I got great feedback and new ideas, and was proclaimed “ready to go and write this thing.”

I’ve tried to write this thing before. This novel’s been in my head since 2010. It’s the hard science fiction manuscript that brought me to LaunchPad. I have eight(ish) chapters of a draft, which I apparently wrote to bring myself to the realization that I was using the wrong point of view, and possibly starting at the wrong part of the story.

Today I’m converting those 14,000(ish) words from first to third person, to see what they feel like there. Then I’ll build on them. They might all stay, they might all go, but I need to look at my foundation to decide whether it fits the house I want to build.